Call For Papers: “Blackness in New England from Crispus Attucks to Ayanna Pressley”

A special issue of The New England Quarterly Guest editors: Kerri Greenidge (Tufts University) and Holly Jackson (UMass Boston) In Dusk of Dawn (1940), W.E.B. Du Bois referred to his New England boyhood in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, as being "shut in by its mountains and provincialism." Similarly, the Jamaican-born poet Claude McKay used "Spring in New Hampshire" (1922) … Continue reading Call For Papers: “Blackness in New England from Crispus Attucks to Ayanna Pressley”

Freeing Eral Lonnon: a Mashpee Indian Presumed a Fugitive Slave in Louisiana, and the Role of Native People in the History of Judicial Abolition in Massachusetts

A summary essay about the 1839 report on the deliverance of Massachusetts citizens liable to be sold as slaves in slave states and a 1936 reference book on historical Massachusetts judicial cases involving people of color By Edward L. Bell scholarly researcher and writer in New England history Abstract: The 1839 Massachusetts legislative Report on … Continue reading Freeing Eral Lonnon: a Mashpee Indian Presumed a Fugitive Slave in Louisiana, and the Role of Native People in the History of Judicial Abolition in Massachusetts